A sense of loneliness in the dreary poem acquainted with the night by robert frost

On the surface it is a short, uninspiring journey on foot through the streets of a city at night. Delve a little deeper however and this poem reveals much more, in typical Frost fashion. You can see this idea emerge again and again in his poems.

A sense of loneliness in the dreary poem acquainted with the night by robert frost

I think the best place to begin discussing this theme is with one of his most famous poems called "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening. He doesn't hear much, except for Loneliness is one of Frost's most profound themes throughout his poetry.

I think the best place to begin discussing this theme is with one of his most famous poems called " Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.

Acquainted With The Night by Robert Frost..I have been one acquainted with the night. I have walked out in rain and back in rain. I have outwalked the furthest city light. I have looked down. Page/5(55). Robert Frost's Acquainted With The Night is a poem that takes the reader into the dark side of the human psyche. On the surface it is a short, uninspiring journey on foot through the streets of a city at night. Robert Frost’s “Acquainted with the Night” is constructed using a terza rima form. Consisting of fourteen lyrical lines written in iambic pentameter, terza rima is a verse form composed of three-line stanzas (or tercets) with interlocking rhymes.

He doesn't hear much, except for the horse giving his "harness bells a shake The woods are lovely, dark and deep, But I have promises to keep, And miles to go before I sleep, And miles to go before I sleep.

We don't know where he is going, but it doesn't seem as if he's going home to someone. He's not necessarily lonely, but he's certainly alone. Many of Frost's poems have this feel to them. Some are set in homes and farmsteads that are far from other people.

Examples are " Mending Wall ," in which two men meet once a year to mend the wall between their farms, and "Out, Out" in which a young boy is killed in an accident involving a saw. A doctor gets to him, but not in time, establishing a great distance between the people in the poem.

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Another example is " Home Burial " in which a family has buried their young child in their backyard, far from town. The sense of distance that Frost creates in his poetry allows for the sense of loneliness of which you speak.Comparing Emily Dickinson's 'We Grow Accustomed to the Dark' and Robert Frost's 'Acquainted with the Night' Words | 3 Pages.

In Emily Dickenson's "We Grow Accustomed to the Dark," and in Robert Frost's "Acquainted with the Night," the poets use imagery of darkness. The two poems share much in common in terms of structure, theme, imagery, and motif.

Acquainted with the Night by Robert Frost: Summary and Analysis Acquainted with the Night is a sonnet that appeared in the volume West-Running Brook written in It records, in the first person, the poet's sojourn in the night.

Many of Frost's poems convey a sense of loneliness, emptiness, alienation, and isolation. "Acquainted with the Night" is just such a poem. The speaker of this poem . Robert Frost's poem, "Acquainted with the Night," expresses depression.

The first line says, "I have been one acquainted with the night" ("Acquainted"). This first line shows that night is a .

Comparing Emily Dickinson's 'We Grow Accustomed to the Dark' and Robert Frost's 'Acquainted with the Night' Words | 3 Pages. the Dark," and in Robert Frost's "Acquainted with the Night," the poets use imagery of darkness.

The two poems share much in common in .

A sense of loneliness in the dreary poem acquainted with the night by robert frost

Comparing Emily Dickinson's 'We Grow Accustomed to the Dark' and Robert Frost's 'Acquainted with the Night' Words | 3 Pages. the Dark," and in Robert Frost's "Acquainted with the Night," the poets use imagery of darkness. The two poems share much in common in terms of structure, theme, imagery, and motif.

Analysis of Poem "Acquainted With The Night" by Robert Frost | Owlcation