Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

Hardison Certified Educator This is an enormous question, and we must keep in mind that when we ask it regarding Elie in Night, we are not approaching it as character development as we would for analysis of fiction. On the contrary, we are considering the changes a man--indeed, a boy--went through in an horrific and very real series of events.

Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

The suffering and death at these and other concentration camps were greater than any before endured. The Holocaust created a void in the souls of many of those who survived. Elie Wiesel was one of those people. Before the Holocaust he had been one of the most devout Jewish children.

Up until the end he waited for God to intervene in Biblical fashion. When that intervention was not forthcoming, he began to doubt in God and in His mercy. He began to accuse God of cruelty against his people.

After the torture was over, he had to reevaluate the role of God in his life. He could be forgiving of God and allow Him another chance, as many he had seen had done. Or he could take on the role of God to himself and try to define his own destiny.

To deal with this, Wiesel has to question God and himself. He does so through his writing. He receives many answers, though none are satisfactory. It might be a scary thought, but true nonetheless.

They felt safe and secure in their faith. Even though things continued to get worse, as Jews were abused in the streets, and the friendly townsfolk started showing deep-seeded hatred of their Jewish neighbors, the Jews still had faith. It was simply a question of holding out for a few days Once again the God of Abraham would save his people, as always, at the last moment, when all seemed lost.

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People around him took the evil as a punishment for some unknown crime the Jews as a people had committed before God. If God wants to see us suffer, it is because we deserve it. It is for our good. In the face of all the suffering Wiesel noted a feeling of guilt in those in his camps, because of which they did not protest and fight back as much as they might have.

If I am here, it is because God is punishing me; I have sinned, and I am expiating my sins. I have deserved this punishment that I am suffering. They thought it must be a test. He wants to find out whether we can dominate our base instincts and kill the Satan within us.

We have no right to despair. The younger people felt it would be better to die fighting than to go like lambs to the slaughter. They had knives and a strong will.

They listened to their teachers, when they spoke like this: We must accept it with our eyes and minds wide open. We are going to die, and God alone knows why, on whose account and for what purpose; I do not know. But He demands our lives in sacrifice, which proves that He remembers us, He has not turned His face from us.

And so it is with joy-pure, desperate, mad joy- that we shall say to Him: Thy will be done. Do not therefore beseech His pity.

Stifle the cries welling up in your hearts. Be proud, instead, and let your pride explode, and I promise you, I your shepherd, to whom you owe obedience, I promise you that the angels in heaven will lower their heads in shame and will never again praise the Creator of man and his universe, never!

And so Wiesel and his town were indoctrinated without incident into the camps, believing that if their faith endured, they would be saved.- Loss of Faith in Elie Wiesel's "Night" Night is a dramatic book that tells the horror and evil of the concentration camps that many were imprisoned in during World War II.

Throughout the book the author Elie Wiesel, as well as many prisoners, lost their faith in God. Loss of Faith in Elie Wiesel's Night Essay - Loss of Faith in Elie Wiesel's "Night" Night is a dramatic book that tells the horror and evil of the concentration camps that many were imprisoned in during World War II.

Initially, Eliezer’s faith is a product of his studies in Jewish mysticism, which teach him that God is everywhere in the world, that nothing exists without God, that in fact everything in the physical world is an “emanation,” or reflection, of the divine world.

The destruction of his faith in the God of his childhood was complete. No longer did his name bring cries of praise from Wiesel.

God seemed unworthy in the face of His worshipers to accept their worship. However, God did not die that day. He is not dead, as the prophet Elijah told Gavriel.

God accepts Wiesel's anger, but He has not died to it. Eliezer Wiesel loses his faith in god, family and humanity through the experiences he has from the Nazi concentration camp. Eliezer loses faith in god. He struggles physically and mentally for life and no longer believes there is a god.

In the next stage of Elie’s relationship with God in Night he becomes disillusioned with God’s power.

Elies redefination of the existence of god and his faith in religion in the concentration camp

One way Elie accomplishes this is by doubting God’s preeminence. Within the concentration camps, the Jews went through torture that caused them to question the foundation of their religion.

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